ELL News Headlines

Throughout the week, Colorín Colorado gathers news headlines related to English language learners from around the country. The ELL Headlines are posted Monday through Friday and are available for free!

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'Hey, Kiddo' Aims to Help Kids with Addicted Parents Feel Less Alone

Throughout his childhood, Jarrett Krosoczka kept painful information about his mother’s heroine addiction and frequent incarcerations hidden. After he became a successful graphic novelist for kids, he considered writing about his own life, but worried his story was too dark. It wasn't until he began meeting young fans with similar life stories that he changed his mind. Krosoczka's new book Hey, Kiddo, tells the story of his mother's addiction and incarceration from the point of view of his 17-year-old self.

In Colorado's High-Poverty Schools, Many Teachers Are Just Starting Their Careers

It's getting harder for new teachers in Colorado to find the support systems they need, since the percentage of Colorado's teachers in their first or second year in the classroom is among the highest in the nation. In 2015-16, the most recent year for which federal data is available, 17 percent of Colorado teachers were new to the classroom, compared with 12 percent nationally. Only Tennessee, Arizona, and Washington, D.C., rank higher.

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized by War

The skinny boy says he's 12, though he looks years younger. He points to a crayon drawing he created this summer, when he arrived at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa, Syria. Therapists have known for decades that a primary way young children communicate and comprehend trauma is by drawing pictures. If that's true, these drawings on the wall are one collective scream.

U.S. Plans to Expand Tent Camp in Texas for Unaccompanied Migrant Children

From a field of ripe cotton, the triangular tops of giant tents swoop up behind a covered fence next to a border crossing where drivers tow banged-up used vehicles into Mexico. From the outside, this is about all that's visible of the temporary shelter for migrant children set up on a remote stretch of West Texas desert. Reporters got a rare glimpse inside the facility on Friday. It opened in June outside the tiny town of Tornillo, Texas, and, at the time, hosted 400 teenage boys. Last month, the federal government announced it was expanding the shelter's capacity to 3,800 beds — making it the largest shelter in the system for kids who cross the border solo. One reason is that it is taking longer for children to be released from the shelters. According to Mark Greenberg, who worked in the Obama administration’s Department of Health and Human Services, some of the children's relatives are reluctant to claim them. HHS is now sharing sponsor information with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. ICE has since used that information to arrest at least 40 undocumented sponsors.

Ballet Folklorico Performs for Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage month brings students to Kellogg Plaza for a very special show. Ballet Folklorico de California State University – San Marcos recently created a two part region dance showcase, La Raza de Folklore, for students on campus.

Hurricane Michael Guts Schools in Florida Panhandle, Shutters Many More

Hundreds of schools in Florida, North Carolina and Virginia were shuttered Friday as communities in the path of Hurricane Michael began to pick up the pieces from one of the strongest storms ever recorded in the United States. The hurricane made landfall Wednesday in the Florida Panhandle and then ripped through Georgia — where some schools closed earlier this week — North Carolina and Virginia.

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