Colorin Colorado: Helping children read... and succeed!

Teachers who work with English as a Second Language learners will find ESL/ESOL/ELL/EFL reading/writing skill-building children's books, stories, activities, ideas, strategies to help PreK-3, 4-8, and 9-12 students learn to read.

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ELL News

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Throughout the week, Colorín Colorado gathers news headlines related to English language learners from around the country. The ELL Headlines are posted Monday through Friday and are available for free!

ELL News Updates

Note: These links may expire after a week or so, and some websites require you to register first before seeing an article. Colorín Colorado does not necessarily endorse these views or any others on these outside web sites.

Latina Climate Scientist on Carbon Emissions Rule and Its Impact on Latino Children

NBC News

August 04, 2015

Nicole Hernandez Hammer, a biologist with expertise on rising sea levels and their impact on urban and natural systems, has studied the impact of climate change on Latinos. She left academic research to inform Latinos on her findings and help the community influence policy decisions on climate change. Hernandez Hammer spoke to NBC News Latino about the Obama administration's new plant emissions rule and why it matters, citing statistics that Latino children are 40 percent more likely to die from asthma.

Bilingual High School Student Helps Smooth Way for Other Kids

CT Post

August 04, 2015

Spanish was Carolina Robles' first language. Born in Mexico, the 16-year-old came to the United States with her parents when she was just 1 year old. This summer, Robles is helping younger bilingual students enrolled in summer school at Oakwood Elementary. She attended elementary school at Oakwood, which serves students in north Lakewood. Her mom suggested she volunteer at her neighborhood school last summer, and she liked it so much, she returned this year. This summer, she has been helping out in the classroom of math teacher Liz Colleran, who doesn't speak Spanish. More than 10 of the 15 students in her classroom do. "She's really patient with the kids and does a great job of explaining," Colleran said.

The 'Granny Cloud': The Network of Volunteers Helping Poorer Children Learn

The Guardian

August 04, 2015

Every week Lorraine Schneiter, a former Open University tutor, sits down in front of her computer, opens up Skype, and calls a group of children in India. And then they chat. Lorraine is 53 and has been running the Skype sessions for the last three years as a member of the "granny cloud" — a hundred of so people who have volunteered to talk to, read with, question and encourage schoolchildren via Skype.

International Baccalaureate Saw Rapid Growth in High-Poverty Schools

Education Week

August 03, 2015

The number of high-poverty U.S. schools participating in an international advanced-diploma program has been rising rapidly, but participation still lags among poor students at those schools.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Coding Camp to Baltimore Schools: Bring Us Your Bored!

NPR

August 03, 2015

On the second floor of Morgan State University's engineering building, Jacob Walker, 12, is putting the finishing touches on a ruler he's just created. Not yet an actual ruler. One he's designing on the computer. He just needs to add his initials — then it's time to produce it on a 3-D printer. Jacob is one of some 50 boys in this free, four-week camp at Morgan State. It's called the Minority Male Makers Program, paid for by Verizon.

DREAM Act Recipient Stands Out on Capitol Hill

The Desert Sun (CA)

August 03, 2015

It was a House of Representatives speech that Sayra Garcia Lozano used to practice speaking English. She was flipping through television channels as a kid and stumbled on the speech. Congressmen enunciated in American accents and she repeated each word out loud. Now, Lozano, a 20-year-old from Palm Desert, is one of 41 interns working in Washington, D.C. this summer for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute.

The first thing schools often get wrong for ELLs is their names

Chalkbeat Indiana

July 31, 2015

The seemingly simple step of recording and calling a student by the correct name can have consequences when mistakes happen.

Report Offers Guiding Principles to Support ELLs with Disabilities

Education Week

July 30, 2015

English-language learners are one of the nation's fastest-growing student populations. But when it comes to English-learners who may also have learning disabilities, states and districts are struggling both to identify these children and to steer them to effective programs. A document released this month from the federal Institute of Education Sciences outlines the challenges facing schools around English-learners and students with disabilities. The document offers examples of what some states are doing around student identification and support of English-learners with disabilities. But the report -- aimed at district and state policymakers -- also acknowledges that the research base in this area is thin. Thus, the policies currently in place may not be working all that well.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Why schools are rushing to hire more bilingual teachers

Fusion

July 29, 2015

As more and more students who don't speak English register for public school this summer, school districts across the country are racing to hire bilingual teachers, and sometimes looking abroad for candidates. Global events -- such as a wave of refugees from the Middle East and undocumented minors from Central America -- and continued growth among the Latino population have led to higher levels of students who don't speak English. But there's been a shortage of bilingual teachers for years.

Creating a Strong Dual Immersion Program

Ed Central

July 27, 2015

In the second part of Ed Central's interview with Karen Beeman, she shares her thoughts on the design, implementation and sustainability of dual immersion programs.

From an 'Undocumented' Boyhood to a Doctorate

The New York Times

July 24, 2015

As Dan-el Padilla Peralta toggled fluidly between worlds for much of his life — ancient and modern, poor and privileged, Dominican and American — there were times when he managed to forget he was a child without a country. He found refuge in New York's libraries, the Greek and Latin texts speaking to him even before he could speak their language. He would copy entire orations, memorizing for inspiration. But always, the fear would return: He could be deported. Now he hopes that by telling his life story in his memoir, Undocumented: A Dominican Boy's Odyssey From a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League, he will be able to further the discussion on immigration policy, which has become a contentious issue on the presidential campaign trail.

My family fled the Vietnam War. Could I preserve their culture and my college GPA?

The Hechinger Report

July 24, 2015

In this editorial, recent college graduate Trong Chang writes, "I was constantly fighting between my roles of being a student and of being a good Hmong daughter; I hated having to fight to decide which role I felt was more important. But I knew that the constant struggle between my two different roles had affected me long before I began college; my being in college just made the struggle that much more visible."

New Mexico Student Wins Second Straight National Spanish Spelling Title

Education Week

July 24, 2015

After 19 rounds and four and a half hours of competition, Andres Arreola correctly spelled añagaza and omnisciencia to win the fifth annual National Spanish Spelling Bee. (In English, añagaza means lure, or decoy. Omnisciencia is a cognate that means omniscience.)

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Closed Captioning Gives Literacy a Boost

Education Week

July 23, 2015

It turns out that reading same-language subtitles while listening to the same words on screen is a complicated transaction. A study by the University of Nottingham, in England, looked closely at just this process — what our eyes are doing when we are listening and reading simultaneously — and its implications for K-12 education seemed significant…(R)ather than being simply annoying, listening to English and reading English subtitles helps in decoding words and reading better.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Why Minority Kids Are Being Left Behind by the Economic Recovery

PBS NewsHour

July 23, 2015

Child poverty is worse now than it was before the Great Recession, despite strides toward economic recovery. That's according to a new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which found that rates were most severe for African-American and Native American children. Gwen Ifill talks to Annie E. Casey Foundation President Patrick McCarthy and Mark Hugo Lopez of the Pew Research Center.

Woman Helping with New Push to Teach Kids How to Swim

WSBTV

July 23, 2015

Just days after a 9-year-old drowned in an apartment pool, there's a renewed push to teach more kids how to swim. According to the USA Swimming Foundation, 70 percent of black children and 60 percent of Latino children can’t swim. Now, metro groups in Atlanta are working to change that.

When Should ELL Test Results Matter Under the ESEA?

Education Week

July 22, 2015

When should English-language learners test results matter for accountability purposes? It's an issue to watch as Congress rewrites the Elementary and Secondary Education Act — and as states are approved for waiver renewals under the current law.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Tampa Area Schools More Mindful of Diversity As Hispanic Enrollment Continues to Rise

Tampa Bay Times

July 22, 2015

Hispanic kindergarten enrollment this past year exceeded white kindergarten enrollment in Hillsborough County, a milestone superintendent Jeff Eakins found significant, as kindergarten numbers are often a bellwether for future growth. The trend defies generalization, as many nationalities and numerous economic groups fall under the self-reported category of Hispanic.

More Children Are in Poverty Today Than Before the Great Recession

PBS NewsHour

July 22, 2015

One out of five American children live in poverty, and we have the Great Recession to blame. That’s according to a new report out today from the Annie E. Casey Foundation that tracks the overall well-being of children in the United States. Today, 22 percent of children live in poverty, up from 18 percent in 2008. Minnesota led the United States in children's overall well-being, with one of the lowest rates of uninsured children in the country. The state also maintains ongoing early childhood education programs that focus on school readiness and provides childcare assistance, says Stephanie Hogenson, research and policy director at the Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota.

N.Y.C. High School Strives for 'Authentic' Assessment

Education Week

July 21, 2015

Tiffany Mungin spent many nervous weeks researching and writing her paper about the Vietnam War. Her high school graduation was on the line. Unlike most New York state seniors, who vied for their diplomas by taking the state's standardized tests, Ms. Mungin had to write a history research paper and an analytic essay in English/language arts. She also had to conduct an original science experiment and undertake an applied-mathematics project in order to graduate. The 18-year-old's work would have to be evaluated by at least two teachers, and she would have to defend it in formal presentations to panels of educators. Her high school is one of 48 schools in the New York Performance Standards Consortium, which have permission to use projects for graduation instead of the state-mandated standardized tests known as the Regents.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.