Colorin Colorado: Helping children read... and succeed!

Teachers who work with English as a Second Language learners will find ESL/ESOL/ELL/EFL reading/writing skill-building children's books, stories, activities, ideas, strategies to help PreK-3, 4-8, and 9-12 students learn to read.

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ELL News

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Throughout the week, Colorín Colorado gathers news headlines related to English language learners from around the country. The ELL Headlines are posted Monday through Friday and are available for free!

ELL News Updates

Note: These links may expire after a week or so, and some websites require you to register first before seeing an article. Colorín Colorado does not necessarily endorse these views or any others on these outside web sites.

Using Comics to Teach English Language Learners

School Library Journal

April 17, 2015

Teacher Dawn K. Wright developed curricula that enabled students to practice their English language skills across all modalities by reading and creating visual narratives. Teaching graphic novels with ELLs requires specific planning and scaffolding of activities. Here are some of her best practices for using graphic novels in the ESL classroom.

Matt de la Peña: How We Talk (or Don't Talk) About Diversity When We Read with Our Kids

Read Brightly

April 17, 2015

In this blog post, Matt de la Peña writes, "Maybe kids look to us (parents, teachers, librarians) before deciding how to frame a new book they've just encountered. If we make a big deal about the differences between the young reader and the characters in the story, isn't the story more likely to be viewed as 'other' in the child's mind? If we focus on the narrative instead, and on the journey of the characters, maybe a young reader's attention will remain here, too."

CBC and WNDB Team Up for Publishing Internships

Publishers Weekly

April 17, 2015

After an influx of donations, the nonprofit organization We Need Diverse Books announced that part of the money would be put to use organizing publishing internships for "job-seekers from diverse backgrounds." The organization announced on April 14 that it will partner with the Children's Book Council in order to offer educational programming to assist job-seekers in entering the publishing industry.

After-School Programs Feel Heat From Congress, Critics

Education Week

April 16, 2015

More than 11,000 other schools and community centers across the country are in limbo because of a congressional tussle over federal funding for after-school programs. The budget talks have reopened a decade-old debate on whether research shows any academic benefits for students enrolled in the programs. At issue is the $1.15 billion 21st Century Community Learning Centers, or CCLC, grant program, the largest source of federal after-school funding.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Coalition Pushes for New Approach to Help Montgomery's Latino Students

Maryland Gazette

April 15, 2015

A new advocacy group is calling for a dramatic shift in how Maryland's Montgomery County Public Schools serves roughly 45,000 Latino students. Members of the recently formed Montgomery County Latino Advocacy Coalition said at a press conference Monday that the school system needs a new approach for the student group that continues to grow.

What Undocumented Students Bring to the Classroom

The Atlantic

April 15, 2015

Andrew Simmons is a writer, teacher, and musician based in California. He has written for The New York Times, Slate, and The Believer. In writing about his undocumented students, he says, "In fact, I view these students as assets to the classroom and school community. I want them there. Perhaps U.S. citizens who wish that undocumented students would disappear from public schools fail to recognize how much they have to offer to America's education system."

In Dayton, A Dual Language Program Helps Students With Limited English

WYSO Public Radio

April 15, 2015

About a quarter of the students who attend Ruskin Elementary School on the east side of Dayton don't speak English as their first language. Of the 11 different languages spoken at the school, Spanish is the most prevalent — and it was the Latino students who inspired the staff at Ruskin to take a different approach to teaching. The school is in its third year of a successful dual language program.

Teen Suicides on South Dakota Reservation Spark Federal Response

Education Week

April 15, 2015

Schools, community leaders, and mental health professionals are rushing to respond to a cluster of suicides on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, in South Dakota, where seven teenagers have killed themselves in recent months.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Professor's Immigrant Journey, Bilingual Education Key to Success

The Orion

April 15, 2015

While living in Torreón, Coahuila, a northern state in Mexico, a 16-year-old student began a life dedicated to education — until her mother made a decision that would forever change her life. In the move from Coahuila to California, Maria Gonzalez, an international languages professor at Chico State, experienced firsthand the difficulties of adjusting to a new culture and becoming bilingual. However, with the help of a local family and reliable education, she broke the barrier of cultural confinement and racial discrimination.

U.S. Refugee Program Ignores Dangers Children Face, Critics Say

NPR

April 14, 2015

The White House has been trying to stem the flow of unaccompanied children into the U.S. from Mexico. Steve Inskeep talks to Human Rights Watch's Bill Felick and the State Department's Simon Henshaw.

Local Groups Work Toward Kindergarten Readiness for Latino Students

WYSO

April 14, 2015

It's pretty much accepted by education researchers that preschool attendance has positive long term effects — people who go to preschool are more likely to be successful in K-12 education and to adapt socially to being around other kids. Yet, preschool numbers for Latino kids nationally and in Ohio are lower than other ethnic groups.

School Districts Looking to Support Popular Dual-Language Programs

The Denver Post

April 14, 2015

Successful dual-language schools in Colorado often start as grassroots efforts, operating on their own paths, working with consultants to get advice on running the programs. But as the number and popularity of the bilingual schools grow, some districts are re-evaluating how to support them and make more of the schools successful.

District Extends Wi-Fi to Students in Public Housing

Education Week

April 13, 2015

Near the Ping-Pong and foosball tables, just steps from the gymnasium, where the sounds of bouncing basketballs echo down the hall, a strange contraption sits against the west wall of the Birch Creek Youth Center. It looks like a cross between an old-school video-arcade console and a modern-day ATM — but it's actually a kiosk placed in the recreation hub by the Kent school district. The kiosk emits free Wi-Fi in a 75-foot radius and features a 42-inch LED screen up top to display the latest district news. For many students who live in nearby public housing and go to school in the surrounding 27,400-student school system, the kiosk acts as a bridge between the digital connectivity they have through laptops and other devices at school and the lack of Internet access they cope with at home.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Silver Spring Dual-Language Program 'An Underground Success Story'

Gazette.Net

April 13, 2015

At Kemp Mill Elementary School in Silver Spring, a group of kindergartners recently watched a fellow student lift a small weight with one hand and a heavier weight with the other. Speaking animatedly, their two teachers delivered a lesson with a bilingual twist.

UNC Suspends Degree in Mexican-American Studies; Latino Students Demand Answers

The Associated Press

April 13, 2015

More than 50 people who attended a forum at the University of Northern Colorado on Friday are demanding answers after a degree majoring in Mexican-American studies was suspended. Latinos in the group said it was an insult to their culture. The hastily arranged forum came after pushback from Latino students and professors following the university's decision to suspend the major last month because of low enrollment.

The Rise in Latino Children's Literature: A 2015 Accounting

School Library Journal

April 10, 2015

Children's Librarian Elizabeth Bird took a look at 2015 published books that feature Latino and Latino-American characters for School Library Journal. Her list includes books for children and young adults.

Schools Could Face Another Influx of Unaccompanied Minors, Analysis Shows

Education Week

April 10, 2015

An estimated 39,000 immigrant children will enter the United States as unaccompanied minors this federal fiscal year, according to a new analysis from the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington-based research group.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

More Black, Latino Teens Say They're Online 'Almost Constantly'

NPR

April 10, 2015

The Pew Research Center's latest study, "Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015," reports that teenagers spend as much time online as adults think they do. Among African-American teens, Pew says 34 percent report going online "almost constantly," as do 32 percent of Hispanic teens, but only 19 percent of white teens say they go online that often. And while African-American teens are most likely to have access to a smartphone, they're have somewhat less access to a desktop or laptop computer at home.

First-Generation Students Unite

The New York Times

April 09, 2015

Ana Barros grew up in a two-family house built by Habitat for Humanity, hard by the boarded-up buildings and vacant lots of Newark. Neither parent attended college, but she was a star student. With a 2200 on her SATs, she expected to fit in at Harvard. Yet on an elite campus, income inequality can be in your face. Weary of trying to pass as middle class, Ms. Barros decided to "come out," borrowing the phrase from the gay community. She joined and now leads the two-year-old Harvard College First Generation Student Union, which has 300 on its email list. "This is a movement," she said. "We are not ashamed of taking on this identity."

Mason Working to Become a "Welcoming University"

Fairfax News

April 09, 2015

The Cisneros Center for New Americans and George Mason University have formed a partnership to make higher education more accessible to immigrant and first generation college students.