Colorin Colorado: Helping children read... and succeed!

Teachers who work with English as a Second Language learners will find ESL/ESOL/ELL/EFL reading/writing skill-building children's books, stories, activities, ideas, strategies to help PreK-3, 4-8, and 9-12 students learn to read.

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ELL News

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Throughout the week, Colorín Colorado gathers news headlines related to English language learners from around the country. The ELL Headlines are posted Monday through Friday and are available for free!

ELL News Updates

Note: These links may expire after a week or so, and some websites require you to register first before seeing an article. Colorín Colorado does not necessarily endorse these views or any others on these outside web sites.

Florida's First Formal Move Against the U.S. Dept. of Ed on ELL Testing

Education Week

October 20, 2014

As promised, Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, has taken its first formal legal step against the U.S. Department of Education over the issue of testing of English-language learners. Scott hasn't filed a lawsuit, but, on Friday, he sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, requesting a hearing on the issue before the Office of the Administrative Law Judges, which deals with government agencies.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

#Weneeddiversebooks: Realistic Fiction with Diverse Protagonists

School Library Journal

October 20, 2014

With the recent call for diverse books for kids of all ages, we're happy to see new titles by debut and celebrated authors with protagonists who haven't always been in the spotlight. From a grieving African American teen working at a funeral home to a teen in war-torn Zimbabwe, these characters defy stereotypes and will ring true for all young adult readers.

Navajo Presidential Race Shaken By Language Gap

NPR

October 20, 2014

According to Navajo law, Navajo Nation presidents must speak the Navajo language to hold office. Chris Deschene is a strong contender for the position, but there's a problem: He's not fluent in the language. The challenge to Deschene's candidacy has become a window into how the Navajo Nation views itself and its cultural future, as well as how Native people continue to define themselves in the face of cultural change.

Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time?

The New York Times

October 17, 2014

For years, child development experts have advised parents to read to their children early and often, citing studies showing its linguistic, verbal and social benefits. In June, the American Academy of Pediatrics advised doctors to remind parents at every visit that they should read to their children from birth, prescribing books as enthusiastically as vaccines and vegetables. On the other hand, the academy strongly recommends no screen time for children under 2, and less than two hours a day for older children. At a time when reading increasingly means swiping pages on a device, and app stores are bursting with reading programs and learning games aimed at infants and preschoolers, which bit of guidance should parents heed?

One Scholar's Path from Homeless Shelter to Halls of Georgetown

PBS NewsHour

October 17, 2014

More than 1.2 million homeless students were enrolled in public schools last year. On top of homework, they face challenges like getting enough to eat and finding shelter that meets basic living standards. The NewsHour's April Brown introduces one student who tackled all of that to become high school valedictorian and a freshman at one of the nation's top universities.

A Focus on Diversity and Savvy Blogging Drive KidLitCon 2014

School Library Journal

October 17, 2014

Diversity was front and center at the 2014 Kidlitosphere Conference (KidLitCon) held in Sacramento, CA, on October 10–11. For the first time, the conference had a theme: "Blogging Diversity in Young Adult and Children's Lit: What's Next?" Inspired by the "We Need Diverse Books" campaign, the event raised a number of issues, including "looking at yourself to make changes." This made for lively and impassioned discussion among the authors, bloggers, and publishers at the conference, now in its eighth year.

Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor?

NPR

October 17, 2014

It's been 13 years since Mister Rogers' Neighborhood went off the air and more than a decade since the passing of its host. But the world Fred Rogers created for preschool children — one that's safe, nurturing and accepting — lives on in a PBS program called Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood.

Philadelphia Teachers Hit by Latest Cuts

The New York Times

October 16, 2014

Money is so short at Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences, a public middle school here, that a nurse works only three afternoons a week, leaving the principal to oversee the daily medication of 10 children, including a diabetic who needs insulin shots. On the third floor filled with 200 seventh and eighth graders, one of two restrooms remains locked because there are not enough hall monitors. And in a sixth-grade math class of 33 students with only 11 textbooks to go around, the teacher rations paper used to print out homework equations.

Opinion: When Racing to the Top Slows Us Down

School Library Journal

October 16, 2014

Dr. Mary Ann Cappiello is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Education at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA. In this column for School Library Journal, she writes, "The instructional potential of the standards, the fluidity with which educators can meet the standards and engage students in thoughtful and meaningful reading, writing, listening, and speaking experiences, are a mere footnote. In Race to the Top schools, the test scores matter too much."

What Will Malala's Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls' Education?

NPR

October 16, 2014

When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she'd won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn't celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England. It was a fitting reaction by someone who's risked her life for the right to be educated.

School Successes Inspire N.C. Push for Dual Language

Education Week

October 15, 2014

At Collinswood Language Academy, a K-8 dual-language school in a working-class neighborhood in this Southern city, students produced some of the highest math achievement scores in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district. And that's the case even though they learn all their math in Spanish, and take North Carolina's annual end-of-grade math exams in English.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

State ELL Student Population Growing in South Dakota

Keloland Television (SD)

October 15, 2014

A growing number of English Language Learners in South Dakota has led to more programs to teach them the language. In fact, about 100 schools have at least one English Language Learner, according to the South Dakota Department of Education. Districts often work with each other to improve services to those students.

English Exam on Belonging Lets Australian Refugee Students Reflect on Their New Life

The Sydney Morning Herald

October 15, 2014

Mohammad Allah-Yari had the advantage of rich personal experience when he was asked to craft a journal entry about belonging during his first HSC (Higher School Certificate) exam on Monday. The Homebush Boys High School graduate, who began the four-week exam period with more than 70,000 peers, is a refugee from Afghanistan. The concept of belonging was the focus of the exam in each subject.

Ed. Dept. and Florida Continue Face-off on Testing of English-Language Learners

Education Week

October 14, 2014

Florida's standoff with the U.S. Department of Education over testing of English-language learners doesn't seem to be going away anytime soon. Florida officials are planning to take legal action against the department this week, according to the Tampa Bay Times, because the state and the feds continue to clash on the question of just when ELLs' performance on tests should factor into the state's system for accountability purposes.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

UC Davis Opens Campus Office for Undocumented Students

The Sacramento Bee

October 14, 2014

As UC Davis began its school year Thursday with the most undocumented students in its history, the university introduced an unprecedented campus office designed to assist them with everything from graduation requirements to legal filings. The concept behind the AB540 and Undocumented Student Center is simple: provide a safe space and a one-stop shop for university services such as financial aid and academic counseling.

It's 2014. All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened?

NPR

October 14, 2014

Take yourself back to those highly emotional, patriotic months after the 9/11 attacks. In the midst of war, terrorism, fear and mourning, one bill passed 87-10 in the Senate and by a similar margin in the House — with equal support from both sides of the aisle. It was signed into law in January 2002 by George W. Bush, with the liberal lion of the Senate, Ted Kennedy, by his side: No Child Left Behind.

Great Titles About 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Malala Yousafzai

School Library Journal

October 10, 2014

At just 17, Malala Yousafzai, the courageous crusader for girls' education in Pakistan and around the world, becomes the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She shares the award with 60-year-old Kailash Satyarthi, an educational reformer from India who has campaigned for children's rights.

Learning Payoff Found for 'City Connects' Program

Education Week

October 10, 2014

Even in resource-rich cities like Boston or New York, students in poverty often miss out on the support and enrichment provided by local museums, businesses, and civic organizations. To fill those gaps, some elementary schools in two states — Massachusetts and Ohio — are working to better coordinate with local partners to provide the kinds of cultural and extracurricular experiences, as well as social services and supports, that boost all students' long-term academic progress.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Young Photographer Brings Stories of Immigrant Children to Light

The World (PRI)

October 10, 2014

Quetzal Maucci, a 21-year-old photographer, is the daughter of two immigrant mothers from Argentina and Peru. But even growing up in a progressive place like San Francisco, she often felt like an outcast because of her background.

Student Crossword: Hispanic Heritage

The New York Times

October 10, 2014

Test your knowledge of Hispanic heritage with The Learning Network by playing their crossword (PDF). When you’re done, you might explore their related Times and Learning Network resources.