Colorin Colorado: Helping children read... and succeed!

Teachers who work with English as a Second Language learners will find ESL/ESOL/ELL/EFL reading/writing skill-building children's books, stories, activities, ideas, strategies to help PreK-3, 4-8, and 9-12 students learn to read.

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Throughout the week, Colorín Colorado gathers news headlines related to English language learners from around the country. The ELL Headlines are posted Monday through Friday and are available for free!

ELL News Updates

Note: These links may expire after a week or so, and some websites require you to register first before seeing an article. Colorín Colorado does not necessarily endorse these views or any others on these outside web sites.

N.J. Gifted School Serves Mostly Poor, Minority Students

Education Week

May 22, 2015

The 200-student magnet program at the Paterson Academy for the Gifted and Talented, housed within Public School 28, enrolls more than 80 percent low-income students, all of them accelerated a grade level or more in math, language arts, or science. Unlike many districtwide gifted magnet programs, the academy's enrollment mirrors the district: roughly 60 percent Hispanic, 20 percent black, 5 percent white, and the rest students from Asian, Indian, and Middle Eastern backgrounds.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Recent Immigrants Find Ellis Island Still Relevant

NPR

May 22, 2015

It's been more than 60 years since Ellis Island closed as a station for inspecting and detaining immigrants. But you can still take a ferry from New York City and cross the Hudson River along the old routes, right to the dock outside a red brick building trimmed with limestone. It was recently renamed the Ellis Island National Immigration Museum to tell immigrant stories beyond the Ellis Island years.

Wyoming Schools Address Growing Number of English Language Learners

Casper Star Tribune (WY)

May 21, 2015

The students in Stacy Jenkins' class are among a growing group of nonnative English speakers in Wyoming's Natrona County school district. The numbers fluctuate, but in the beginning of the school year, there were 287 students needing extra English help, according to school data — more than twice the number of students than at the start of the 2011 school year. Statewide, there were 3,619 students, representing a 13 percent increase from 2009 but a small dip from the increase last year.

Dual Language Learners Reader Post #2: Who are Dual Language Learners?

EdCentral

May 21, 2015

Children between the ages of zero- and eight-years-old are the most diverse age group in the United States. Compared to other age groups, they are more likely to be racial and/or ethnic minorities, be born to immigrant parents, and speak a language other than English. Many of these young children are considered dual language learners (DLLs). Yet despite this fact, it is somewhat difficult to find a good estimation for just how many DLLs there are.

New Irving, TX School Board Member Wants to Help Immigrant Parents Learn English

KERA News

May 21, 2015

In this profile, KERA charts a different sort of journey — the one Dinesh Mali made from childhood in India to his spot as the first Indian-American elected to the Irving school board.

Seattle Schools to Expand ELL Services After Critical State Audit

Education Week

May 20, 2015

The Seattle school system will expand its English-language-learner services after a scathing state audit determined that the district shortchanged language-learner students and their families.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Amtrak Crash Victim Is Remembered for Helping Students in Need

The Wall Street Journal

May 20, 2015

Medgar Evers College student Camoy Honegan was thrilled to learn Tuesday morning that one of her school's deans had arranged a $3,000 grant for her books and expenses. Ms. Honegan already felt indebted to Derrick Griffith, a dean at the CUNY college in Crown Heights, for spending a day helping her locate a place to live this winter, when she was homeless. But this time, she didn't have the chance to thank him. Mr. Griffith, 42 years old, was one of the eight fatal victims of Tuesday's train derailment in Philadelphia.

Introducing the Dual Language Learners Reader: Post #1

EdCentral

May 20, 2015

This post kicks off a 10-week series on research, policies, and practices pertaining to the education of dual language learners (DLLs) in U.S. public schools on EdCentral.com. Collectively, these posts constitute a DLL Reader that aims to provide a common, foundational base of knowledge to inform policy conversations about these students.

Pompton Lakes High School Student Earns ESL Achievement Award

NorthJersey.com

May 19, 2015

The Pompton Lakes Rotary Club this past week presented its English as a Second Language (ESL) 2015 Student Achievement Award to Pompton Lakes High School senior Hadil Zeidan, a student from Palestine, who has excelled and along the way earned the respect and admiration of her new community.

Chiawana High Senior Nabs $10,000 Scholarship at Hispanic Academic Achievers Program

Tri-City Herald (WA)

May 19, 2015

Nayeli Cervantes has 12 nieces and nephews under the age of 10. It will be years before any of them start applying to college and picking their degrees, but the Chiawana High School senior has made it her mission to start planting the seeds of higher education now. Cervantes, 17, of Pasco, will be the first in her family to go to college when she attends Seattle University in the fall. After receiving $10,000 on Friday night from the Hispanic Academic Achievers Program, she is feeling even more secure in her financial future.

Annapolis Fire Department Promotes First Hispanic Officer

Capital Gazette (MD)

May 19, 2015

Bud Zapata says he enjoys breaking stereotypes. The first Hispanic firefighter for Annapolis, MD, he is proud to serve as a trailblazer and role model for Hispanic children in the city. "They're fascinated," Zapata said. "It's not very common to see a Hispanic firefighter." Last month, Zapata was promoted to lieutenant, becoming the first Hispanic officer in the department's history. It's not the first time the 29-year-old has been a pioneer. He became the city's first Hispanic paramedic a year ago.

Bureau of Indian Education Overhaul May 'Fall Short,' Lawmakers Fear

Education Week

May 18, 2015

By the end of the summer, the Bureau of Indian Education will have a plan in place to begin fixing many of the poor and often unsafe schools across Indian Country, Charles Roessel, the bureau's director, said Thursday at a House education committee hearing.

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Q & A with Author Deborah Jiang-Stein: Bringing Libraries to Prison Nurseries

School Library Journal

May 18, 2015

Deborah Jiang-Stein was born in prison to a mother addicted to heroin. Today, she is an author of the memoir Prison Baby (Beacon Press, 2014) and the founder of a nonprofit dedicated to providing life skills and mentoring to incarcerated women, the unPrison Project, which recently announced its partnership with the Children's Book Council (CBC) to build libraries in prison nurseries.

Argentina Experiments with Chinese-Spanish Bilingual Education

Want China Times

May 18, 2015

"In the past, one learnt French for literature and English for business. What is the language of the future? Maybe Chinese," tweeted Buenos Aires mayor Mauricio Macri, when the world's first Chinese-Spanish bilingual public school opened here in March last year. The school, opened thanks to the joint efforts of the municipal governments of Buenos Aires and Beijing, hopes to eventually have some 400 students.

Academy Links STEM Lessons, Families

The News-Gazette

May 15, 2015

When Reuben Chambers' artsy fourth-grade son joined a STEM-focused after-school program, he never imagined little Donovyn would wind up teaching him a thing or two about electrical engineering. Chambers and his son together are members of the St. Elmo Brady's STEM Academy at Booker T. Washington and Garden Hills elementary schools. Sponsored by the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering department at the University of Illinois, the kids spend time learning how to conduct various experiments that align with science and math concepts they've learned in class.

It's Natural: Science Picture Books for Storytime

School Library Journal

May 15, 2015

The following titles selected by the editors at Junior Library Guild appeal to children's innate curiosity about the natural world. Titles include the recently published Juna's Jar by Jane Bahk, about a little girl whose kimchi jar used for her nature collections inspires her imagination after her best friend (and collecting partner) Hector moves away.

Eagles Nest Intermediate School Sixth Grade Student Completes High School Algebra Course

Navajo-Hopi Observer (AZ)

May 15, 2015

Jehron Smith, a middle school sixth grade student at Eagles Nest Intermediate School in Tuba City, is rocketing past the sixth grade math level and taking high school freshman level Beginning Algebra I. With the support of Tuba City Unified School District administration, he is earning high school math credit in partnership with Stanford University's Education Program for Gifted Youth (EPGY).

Unaccompanied Child Migrants From Central America: Where Are They Now?

The Diane Rehm Show

May 14, 2015

Last year, tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors from Central America crossed the U.S. border. Diane Rehm looks at what happened to those children and how the government will handle those who arrive this year.

To Help Language-Learners, Extend Aid to Their Families Too, New Study Argues

Education Week

May 14, 2015

A new report from the Center for American Progress makes the case that communities looking to improve education for school-aged English-language learners should also offer services to their parents. The report also found that language-learner students are more likely to attend high poverty schools, with a lack of adequate resources, and that the growth of immigrant communities across the United States has led to "uneven and inadequate instruction to adult English instruction."

Note: This links to content from Education Week. You can register for free to access 10 Education Week stories a month, or subscribe for unlimited access.

Latino Parents: More Bilingual Staff Needed in Medford Schools

Mail Tribune (OR)

May 14, 2015

Latino parents have again asked the Medford School Board to commit to hiring more qualified, bilingual staff. Advocates said this is the third consecutive year that Latino parents have made similar requests. School Board Chairman Jeff Thomas Friday said that their requests are not falling on deaf ears. There are a lot of employers fighting for a few qualified, bilingual educators, he said, adding that, ultimately, the district may need to start "growing its own" by providing incentives for students interested in education to come back and teach in the district.