Ying-Hwa Hu

Books by This Illustrator

A Fish to Feed

A young boy and his father talk about a fish bowl
Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 0-3
Language: Spanish (Bilingual Eng/Sp)

A toddler and Daddy go shopping for a pet fish. On the way they find other fish, but those aren ’t fish to feed. Toddlers will love seeing different fish through holes in the pages. Daddy responds to the child ’s simple words with full sentences, adds more information and asks open-ended questions.

Alicia's Happy Day

By: Meg Starr
Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 6-9

"Alicia's mother guides her through streets where she is greeted by neighbors, shopkeepers, street vendors, and even taxi drivers. Expanding on the fantasy quality of the day, airplanes write a salutation in the sky and pigeons bow to the birthday girl. Finally, this perfect interlude is rounded out by a huge ice-cream cone from the Icey man and a party with her loving extended family." — School Library Journal

Banana for Two

Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 0-3
Language: Chinese, Hindi, Spanish (Bilingual Eng/Sp), Vietnamese

Mama, her toddler, and two stuffed bunnies turn a grocery store outing into an opportunity to talk, laugh, and learn a little math. As they fill their cart with items in quantities of one and two, Mama lets her baby hold them, connecting the familiar idea of one and two hands to concepts of one and two.

Clean Up, Up, Up!

Father helping his son put books away
Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 3-6
Language: Spanish

It is cleanup time, and Daddy and his little one are putting away books, blocks, teddy bears, and train cars, and preparing for dinner — all while having fun with math! As Daddy talks with his toddler, he uses spatial-relationship math words and phrases like up, down, inside, outside, next to, and under to reinforce his young learner’s understanding. When it is dinnertime, the little one proudly demonstrates an understanding of down when helping to set the table and up while enjoying the first delicious bite! Spanish version available.

Jingle Dancer

Illustration of a young girl jingle dancing
Age Level: 6-9
Language: English

Jenna wants to dance in the powwow as her grandmother and other women in her family have. But she wonders: will she have enough jingles to make her dress sing? As Jenna finds a way to collect the jingles she needs, she learns more about her family and the traditions they have upheld across generations. Traditional and contemporary activities come together in this appealing, clearly illustrated story of a modern girl and her background, based on the author's Muscogee (Creek) heritage.

Related VideoCynthia Leitich Smith talks about "Jingle Dancer"

Red Socks

Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 0-3
Language: Chinese, Hmong, Spanish (Bilingual Eng/Sp)

Baby has fun with Mama as she folds the clean laundry and dresses the baby. A sock is missing! When found and Baby is dressed, it’s time to play outside. Little ones will love seeing Baby getting dressed and finding the sock. Throughout the story Mama talks with Baby about what she and Baby are doing.

Rosa's Very Big Job

Illustrated by: Ying-Hwa Hu
Age Level: 3-6
Language: Spanish (Bilingual Eng/Sp)

When spunky preschooler Rosa decides to help out her busy mama, she enlists Grandpa’s help to put away the clean laundry.

Sam and the Lucky Money

Illustration of young boy near Chinese dragon
Age Level: 6-9

Sam can't believe that he has his very own lucky money to spend while walking through Chinatown's New Year celebrations! Perhaps some sweets…or sticky buns…or a new basketball? But when Sam meets an old homeless man on the street without any shoes, he realizes that perhaps there are more important things that he can do with his lucky money. Soft watercolor paintings emphasize the emotional impact of this tale of generosity for the New Year.

Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree (Reading Rainbow Book)

Illustration of young Zora Hurston sitting under a tree
Age Level: Middle Grade (9-14)

Product Description: Zora is full of dreams. From the top of the chinaberry tree, she dreams of living in the cities beyond the horizon. Her father thinks she should wear dresses and leave dreaming and tree-climbing to boys. But her mother teaches Zora that like each new branch of the chinaberry tree, dreams are always within reach. Independent and full of spirit, Zora explores her hometown and listens to the stories of its people — stories her mother makes her promise to remember. But it isn't until Zora is faced with her mother's death that she realizes the importance of her promise.